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CCNA - CCNP

Discussion in Hardware Hangout started by Marshall, Apr 20, 2012

  1. Mar 6, 2012
    Posts
    Hello guys,

    I know we have a lot of IT professionals here. So I wanted to get others opinions on this. I am currently working on getting my CCNA and want to have my CCNP by the end of the year. I am currently using CBT Nuggets and Study guides since I already work in networking I have most of the basics down.

    My question to you is, how did you go about getting your certifications? Was it difficult for you? I already have several professional level certifications, but I have not gotten anything as in depth as the CCNA. This is not about whether or not degrees are better than certifications. And I do not want to be directed to brain dumps. Thank you!
    • Like Like x 1
    • Dec 7, 2010
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      CCNA is a simple first tier certificate for networking. That doesn't mean its not valuable, it just means it is the first step. The various forms of CCNP is extremely valuable and is highly sought after in the industry. Just as a comparison MCSEs are not even worth the paper they are printed on, while CCNPs commands high level of demand and pay from the IT community. The main difference between a MCSE and CCNPs are: 1) MCSEs are only good for people who knows how to take tests. They are complete garbage and does not represent the real world. 2) To receive the highest level of Cisco Certifications, you are actually placed in real world environments in which you are to troubleshoot. Directly applicable in the real world.

      Depending on the Cisco Certifications you are focusing on, you can probably expect to make anywhere from $64,000 to $84,000 starting per year. I know seasoned Cisco Engineers command $150,000 and above per year.

      For those looking to get jobs in the IT industry I always advise them to choose the 3 highest demand careers today and for the next 5-6 years:

      1) Network Engineering (obtaining a Cisco Professional Certification)
      Networks are always growing and there will always be a demand for architects and engineers alike.

      2) DBA (DataBase Administrators)
      In the information centric world we live in, being able to collect, process and deploy information is one of the top critical jobs in the world today.

      3) Programmers
      With the massive growth in the personal digital space, there is a massive need for developers to create apps for everything from mobile devices to internet centric platforms.

      I have been an IT director for a Fortune 500 company so I know the industry fairly well and would recommend these as the top 3 job prospects for the next half decade and beyond.
      • Informative Informative x 3
      • Useful Useful x 1
        Harvey, Apr 20, 2012 Last edited by Harvey, Apr 20, 2012
      • Sep 25, 2010
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        I bought books from cisco-press and study from them. Unfortunately I have to learn all the basics by myself so I'm studying for my CCENT right now. Best of luck!
      • Mar 6, 2012
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        Well, I would suggest CBT Nuggets for a general overview of it all. It goes from OSI model through the CCNA specifics.
      • Apr 9, 2007
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        I qualify for A+, CCENT, and soon CCNA in around 6w. The Microsoft ones as Harvey pointed out seem to be a complete joke. Everything I've done thus far has been rather pointless/mindless, and I'm not really sure if I should even bother with them.

        With this being said, I'm in the same boat as you, any information is helpful/useful. Thank you for making the thread!
        • Like Like x 1
        • Oct 27, 2010
          Posts
          I plan on taking the CCNA and CCNP sometime this summer, with the eventual goal of getting a CCIE. I've read trough the Cisco press CCNA books and have taken several class on the subjects associated with it. One thing that is always helpful is to take as many practice tests as you can prior to taking the real thing. Once you can consistently get a high score on the practice exams you'll be ready for the real thing.
        • Nov 11, 2011
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          I received my A+ (worth jack shit) and CCNA circa 2006. Most companies don't give much credence to anything below a CCNP certification and of course, CCIE being the doctorate of networking. I highly recommend taking Harvey's advice. Studying questions will help you, but memorizing them won't. As far as my memory serves, the test contained several 30 point questions for which you were given real life scenarios and actually had to work between five workstations (simulated, duh) and implement, say, access lists (i.e, workstation 1 can't access workstation 5, workstation 3 can't access this subnet, etc). It's best to actually find yourself a Cisco router (and appropriate cables) or a setup where you can practice. Believe me, the test will be rough if you did not practice and you will take a huge hit if you can't perform well on the simulations. Oh, and one more thing, you only get one shot at a question, meaning, you can't go "back" if you press "next question." :tremble:

          EDIT:
          CCNP and CCIE demand high salaries... believe me, it's not a waste.
          • Useful Useful x 2
          • Mar 6, 2012
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            So I work for [Company Name], on 3rd shift, working with Servers and Networking. I can handle Windows, Linux, etc. My weak point is completely networking. I spoke with the only CCNP in Oklahoma City at the company I work for (Not the only IN oklahoma city, just the only one I work with) He suggested the The Cisco Switch 3550. It is cheap can handle the latest iOS and obviously can do all the basic functions you need to know in CCNA and CCNP.

            Anyone have feedback on this switch. I will be purchasing one soon. I also have IOU, that can be run on a VM to allow you to simulator the iOS in putty, as well as Packet Tracer. If any of you are interested in any of this... I now have CBT Nuggets CCNA Real World Applications with literally walks you through setting up a fictitious company and setting up there network. I am willing to host it and offer it up to any of you.

            Edit: I previously stated 3650, when I meant 3550.
            Link to Cisco 3550
            • Useful Useful x 2
            • Oct 27, 2010
              Posts
              Another useful simulator is GNS3 (Graphical Network Simulator). It's very similar to Packet Tracer but allows you to do more. For instance, PT can't do HSRP, VRRP, or GLBP simulations but with GNS3 you can. The only issue is that it requires that you have a copy of the IOS of the particular device you want (those are easy enough to find though) to work with and that it's a little complicated to get this set up; I prefer it to PT though.

              If you do decide to play around with it try using 3600 series stuff and up, 2600 stuff seems to crash it a lot.
              • Agree Agree x 1
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              • Apr 9, 2007
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                Ha! Sorry, I was talking about the Microsoft ones in my head.
              • Nov 11, 2011
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                Oh, haha. Yeah, MS degrees don't hold their values. Go with CCNP/CCIE, you won't regret it.
                • Like Like x 1
                • Feb 21, 2007
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                  I know nothing about software :frown:
                • Nov 11, 2011
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                  There is nothing you can't study and learn and.... wait hold the fuck up! You're a doctor, now enlarge my penis!
                • Dec 7, 2010
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                  Wow, you're such a dick. :razz:
                  • Funny Funny x 1
                  • Wizard! Wizard! x 1
                  • Mar 6, 2012
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                    So, I got to see the joke that is Juniper switches for the first time at work. Anyone have any insight on them?

                    Sent from my Nexus S 4G using Tapatalk 2
                  • Apr 9, 2007
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                    Watch out for leap years :razz:

                    I was under the impression that they were faster at routing compared to Cisco gear. I know my ISP uses them internally, my EDU switched to them at New Years.