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Forcing Nonce Reuse in WPA2

Discussion in Networking started by Tony The Tiger, Oct 16, 2017

  1. Feb 27, 2012
    Posts
    These guys seem to have discovered a new exploit within WPA2. Note, that the attacker would have to already be connected to the network in order them to perform this exploit. Essentially this is a "man in the middle" attack, but with more devastating consequences.

    Give the article a read. The tools won't be released until a patch is released, so there are no serious worries about this going around right now. However, keep an eye out for updates to your router firmware.

    https://www.krackattacks.com/
    • Informative Informative x 2
    • Aug 7, 2012
      Posts
      Android 6.0+ is properly fucked if vendors don't patch when the November 7 security update drops. Managed infrastructure devices have been patched, but there are still a ton of local devices that will never be patched. You should be using a VPN for any Internet use on public WiFi, even if it's WPA2 protected.
    • Dec 6, 2011
      Posts
      A VPN would circumvent this exploit? From the read it sounds like a VPN wouldn't matter if the attacker is already connected.
    • Apr 9, 2007
      Posts
      No, they have patches available... trickling down is going to take years. SOHO or Residential gear is most likely never going to be patched.
    • Aug 7, 2012
      Posts
      The exploit is designed to decrypt or MITM your traffic, if you use a VPN on top of your traffic all the attacker will get is your encrypted VPN traffic.
      Post Merged, Oct 22, 2017
      This is true and will be a great red team point over the next few years. Especially since most of the attacks were focused on the endpoint devices. Your wifi doorbell/webcam/fridge/smoke detector is never going to get a firmware update. Better hope those don't transmit data across the network (even internal) unencrypted.