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Random Crash / Blue lines

Discussion in Technical Support started by Kloud, May 7, 2014

  1. Apr 3, 2013
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    Was recording a demo on CS GO when suddenly my screen froze and went white. No idea why that happened so I went and restarted. The screen is now covered in some mysterious blue lines and I can only seem to boot from safe mode. If I try to start from normal mode the screen just goes black after the "Starting Windows" thingy. I think it's the video card or something but I wanna be sure if it really is that. Anyone have any idea why this is happening?
    Interesting thing is that there's an update for my graphics card driver but it refuses to be installed
    [IMG]
    [IMG]
    [IMG]
    Kloud, May 7, 2014 Last edited by Kloud, May 7, 2014
  2. Mar 20, 2012
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    There are tools which clean your current driver from your harddrive...might wanna do this before installing the new one.

    maybe "driversweeper" idk
  3. Apr 28, 2013
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    Graphics card possible failure maybe? I would try and send it to some tech center and have them try and fix it. It's probably a hardware issue.
  4. Jan 30, 2013
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  5. Feb 27, 2012
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    @Kloud

    Since this is happening before you are even into the OS, it seems like it's hardware or cable related. Try re-seating your GPU, make sure all the power connectors are in there snug, and that your cable is completely plugged in. Try a new cable and port if possible. Then, if you still can only go to safe mode, try running this program and reinstalling your drivers. Make sure you get rid of PhysX as well (don't think it's necessary, but i always do it anyway)
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Feb 24, 2011
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      What graphics card do you have? How old is it?
      Is it a possibility that it just went blerp on you due to old age?
      Something similar happened to me recently as well after a few series of weird glitches/graphical crashes while playing CS:S.
      • Funny Funny x 1
      • Apr 3, 2013
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        Using an AMD Radeon HD 6800 and it's about two years old. I probably have a spare one lying somewhere if that's needed.
        Kloud, May 7, 2014 Last edited by Kloud, May 7, 2014
      • May 31, 2012
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        ^ this is the route I would choose. Occam's razor.
      • Mar 30, 2013
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        Kloud i got the same problem you have. It was the video card.

        I was playing css, and the screen became white, and i had to restart the computer.
        Like you, if i don't start it in safe mode, after the window, the screen goes black and nothing happen.

        If you don't change the video card quick, all the blue lines will be worse.



        I still have a photo of it:
        [IMG]
        • Informative Informative x 1
          Moltard, May 8, 2014 Last edited by Moltard, May 8, 2014
        • Apr 3, 2013
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          I'm gonna try to replace the video card later on but I managed to boot from normal mode (Not safemode) but got whitescreen'd a couple of minutes later.
          Post Merged, May 8, 2014
          Problem is that I cannot install new drivers for some unknown reason while in safe mode.
        • Nov 17, 2012
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          Might be a PSU issue.

          Mine recently was turning off randomly and caused similar issues to this.
        • Apr 3, 2013
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          Yep, my video card is now in the heaven of PC stuff. Replacing it worked.
        • Jun 11, 2012
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          Another bites the dust.

          Upgrade yo old stuff!
        • Feb 27, 2012
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          Did you try just re-seating it and making sure the power connectors were correctly inserted? Also, it could be what Complexity said. If the PSU is dying, the card won't get enough power to it and can cause some strange anomalies. Although, i'm pretty sure it's just the card in this case. You should try running this program with the card you just put in. It is like Prime 95 for your GPU. It will put your graphics card at full load, so it will use as much power as it needs under full load. I used it when my 280 died to confirm with was a GPU issue. You could also put your 6800 back in and run the test. What card did you just replace your 6800 with?
        • Apr 3, 2013
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          Replaced it with a Geforce GTS 250
        • Feb 27, 2012
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          Oh gosh. That's quite the downgrade.
          • Agree Agree x 1
          • Dec 30, 2006
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            Whelp, you don't make money from trolling.
            • Informative Informative x 2
            • Mar 26, 2009
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              Artifacting is usually caused when a BGA solder joint on the GPU fractures and it no longer makes proper contact with the video card PCB. Some cards are more prone to this than others, but you can do things to help prevent the issue from occurring. The first is to obviously leave the computer running all the time. This consumes more power, but it keeps the GPU at a constant temperature so the solder joints aren't constantly shocked from the rapid cooling/heating and getting metal fatigue. The second is to make a custom fan profile to keep the GPU as close to the idle temperature as possible while the GPU is under load, because again the solder joints won't be stressed from more heat. The narrower the temperature range of your GPU at all times, the longer it's going to last.

              But since the BGA joints have already failed, there's two ways to fix artifacting cards (assuming you don't have a warranty anymore):

              1) Take it to one of those BGA rework shops that fix RRODs on Xbox360s and YLODs on PS3s and have them reflow the GPU on the video card PCB. This usually costs more than the card is worth, so unless you have some limited edition card like an ASUS Mars or high end out of production card you really want working, it isn't worth it.

              2) The good ole heatgun fix (no, not a hair dryer.) Using a heatgun in the right spot can re-melt fractured BGA solder joints under the GPU since the fracture is usually only a few microns apart. This fix is cheap, but it may not last forever, especially if you don't do it correctly. You also have the risk of damaging the PCB or components if you don't use proper heat shielding.

              I've done the heat gun fix on several video card GPUs, desktop motherboard chipsets and laptop motherboard chipsets/GPUs and more often than not they start working again. I've only had a few that required multiple treatments and a scarce few that didn't work due to other issues (like bad VRAM.)

              I do take repair requests so if anyone wants to pay round trip shipping for a bad card, I'll attempt to fix the card. I can't guarantee how long the fix will last though, if the fix works.