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What is the purpose of Linux?

Discussion in Software Sanctuary started by Brett, Mar 25, 2013

  1. Dec 6, 2011
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    What's the purpose of Linux? Zenzr's thread kind of sparked my memory that I was wondering why people used it. What are the advantages of it over Windows? Why use it (Pros and Cons)? Or is Linux equal to Windows, but just a different approach to an OS?

    EDIT: I'm quite unfamiliar with anything Linux. Are there different versions of it, or how does it work?
  2. Jul 8, 2012
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    My main reason is I work as a Help Desk Technician, and this year I've gotten a few people in with Linux, and I had no idea how to help them as I've never used Linux before. I mainly just want to learn about it. From what I've understood so far (I think) some of the main pros are it's cheaper than both Windows and Mac OS, it generally takes far less resources to run (so people install it on older machines to keep them alive) and more customization (If you know what you're doing I think). Also I just want to learn how to use it, as I'm taking C++ classes so anything programming related is interesting to me.
  3. Nov 11, 2011
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    It's open source (and free). You can create your own 'version' of linux and call it BrettOS v1.0. You can mix and match packages. You can't really sell it, although there are ways... but I'm not getting into that. There is a lot of flexibility in using both Linux and Windows personally for me. To your questions, you can pretty much have extremely low down time with linux since most tasks don't require restarting your system, there are different OS's that are linux based. Examples include: Slackware, Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora Core, etc. They all are unique in their own sense but their foundation is nix.
  4. Dec 6, 2011
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    So what about compatibility? What programs (such as Office software and Steam games) work with it?

    I'm slowly trying to make my way into programming/coding and whatnot, so I've been considering Linux. I just don't know much about it.
  5. Nov 11, 2011
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    Well, you can program and code on any system. That shouldn't be the reason why you migrate to Linux. And almost every Windows program you can think of, there is a Linux equivalent (Photoshop = gimp, Word = openoffice, etc). There are also emulators where you can run Windows programs inside of Linux. Compatibility really isn't an issue as it once used to be. I remember I used to use WineX to run all my games. Good old days.
  6. Jul 8, 2012
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    Seconded. Save a few programs, none of which I know off the top of my head, there is basically an equivalent that can be run in Linux that does just as good if not better. I happen to like OpenOffice and Gimp.
  7. Dec 6, 2011
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    So these emulators allow you to run any game? Are they resource-heavy?
  8. Jan 21, 2011
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    Not any game but most work. There is a chart showing what games work well with wine on their wiki. It is a bit resource heavy from what I remember.

    Sent from my Nexus 10 using Tapatalk HD
  9. Jun 11, 2012
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    Wine create a environment for your games so it will run as though you are in windows but without having to run another thing. It's not ressource heavy and you won't even feel it, unless you have like 256MB of ram and in that case downloadmoreram.com.

    Linux is nice for programming because I don't have to deal with so many broken tidbit that MS OS has. While true you can program with Windows and I had the best experience by either using Cygwin + MinGW for C++ or Eclipse for C++, Java, Lua or many other languages. But there are so many issue that I encountered while programming in Windows in terms of trying to lock you to this environment, Linux is like "Screw you there's a open field with flowers, rainbow, and puppies and you can do whatever you want in time.

    Other reason why I use Linux are for Samba Share (not a cool energetic dance) but a services that runs that let me share 5 HDD that are connected to my Linux server, that runs with no UI so headless, to anybody in my network. Think of how you were able to go from PC to PC at your school and still be able to connect to your network folder.
  10. Dec 6, 2011
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    Thanks for this. What's the emulator called? "Wine"? And no, I run 128MB of RAM, so I believe I'm good. =D
  11. Apr 9, 2007
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    WINE Is Not an Emulator.
    • Wizard! Wizard! x 1
    • Jun 11, 2012
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      Yeah Wine [http://www.winehq.org]. The main reason people use/used this is due to is they either have a only Linux OS installed or they dislike of windows and never use it (I know some, meh). It's really not a emulator but more an Interface between the Linux OS and the game kinda kinda like a drivers that tell the hardware what to do when the software ask for something.

      It's like a translator between the OS and the Game (I had some many "It's Like", it should be kinda clear for you lol but if not I suck at explaining)
    • Dec 6, 2011
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      No I understand completely. This will probably be something I'll consider for my Q4 2013 build, when it comes. For that matter, how exactly does "dual-boot" work?
    • Mar 12, 2008
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      All I know about Linux is it's free, easy to set up with hardware to make a server, and it's supposedly easy to utilize (to an extent). I'm interested in learning what else it can do, but I'm not a hardcore user so I don't know all of it's possibilities.
    • Jul 8, 2012
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      When you turn your computer on, you chose which OS to use. that's it lol
    • Dec 6, 2011
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      Oh. I thought it'd be something like, switching at any time or both OSs at once... lol
    • Jun 11, 2012
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      Dual/Triple/Quadruple-Boot is when 2 or more OSes are installed on your HDD. So each OS takes a portion of drive space to use for OS installation and free space for the use to use. Usually when you install a OS on a drive that already has an OS you can specify how much space you want to give it and it will reserve the first free sector of your HDD, which is usually where another OS ends.

      When you install an OS your also installing the Master Boot Record which is what controls which Os to boit in this case Windows. So if you pop in a Linux Distribution, for example Ubuntu, it will ask to you if you want to rewrite the Master Boot Record to use Grub. This will allow the PC to not only boot Ubuntu but to also list other OSes that are installed in your drive so you can scroll through them and select which one to boot. This is missing from Windows MBR. Also if you reinstall Windows but choose to keep thw other OS partition, it will overwrite GRUB and replaces with the Windows MBR. So you wont be able to boot your other OSes which is easy to fix as far as I recalled.

      I'll update this with some pics to help my mangled typing from a phone :razz:

      Sent from my blanket using an Lysol Spray
    • Jul 8, 2012
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      Basically what bender said lol. As far as I know you can't switch at any time unless you run them in virtual machines. Installing grub is extremely easy, and disk partitioning is extremely easy as well once you know what you're doing too.

      Sent from my SCH-I500 using Tapatalk 2
    • Jun 11, 2012
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      Oh yeah, you can't switch on the fly. This requires a reboot where you'll be able to choose which OS you want to boot into to.

      This is quite an old GRUB pic. But you can have other OSes like Mac OS X, Windows 7, Mint, Ubuntu and so on. Grub is smart enough to detect the OS you installed.

      [IMG]
    • May 12, 2012
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      virus thats what i use it for.