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Where to start

Discussion in Programming started by Merlin, Oct 20, 2014

  1. Oct 10, 2014
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    So i was thinking about trying to learn the art of programming, however as I have no experience in this area, would someone be kind enough to recommend a good starting point. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you in advance.
  2. Jul 8, 2012
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    Do you have any language(s) you want to learn? That usually helps some with where to start. I started with C++, but you could do that or Java or something maybe.

    Here is a pretty good intro site to C++, and some other useful information. You can also ask @Luffaren or @Benderius too if you have questions.
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    • Oct 10, 2014
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      I will be sure to check out the link when I get home, but c++ does seem to be a good direction to head from what I've read.
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      • Jun 11, 2012
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        If you fancy a little tiny challenge then C++ is a great way language to start with. As posted http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/introduction/ is the best tutorial for C++ programming. I highly suggest/recommended/demand to go through each page and test it out. They are well written to explain the basic and complex stuff fairly well.

        Get the Eclipse CDT IDE which is the most friendliest IDE you can start with (but it is a bit overwhelming at the same time). Codeblock is the lightest and fastest if you have a tiny patience in setting thing up....actually see if you can compile anything with Codeblock+Mingw.

        Also PATIENCE I can't stress that out.


        Now if you find C++ a bit overwhelming to understand then Java can be of help to understand the basic of coding, they differentiate on the "how" and the "what" but the foundation of coding and architecting are similar. And setting up for Java and starting is a bit easier since it takes care of veiling you from the complexity.

        Java is also pretty great at exposing you to thing a bit easier and explanations on the internet for Java seems to be directed at new people to programming compared to C++.
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        • Oct 10, 2014
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        • May 31, 2012
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          That cplusplus website website is resourceful but I feel like it's similar to a dictionary: You have to know what you're looking for. I recommend browsing through a school's website and copying the lecture slides. Professors tend to put the material in a good order and probably have homework assignments posted, which you can use as challenges. I took C++ at a Community College, but one of the professors at my current University posted his C programming lectures publicly: http://eceweb.ucsd.edu/courses/ECE15/FA_2013/lectures.php

          I have *heard about Code Academy from a lot of people, but I have never used it.

          The best way to learn is to practice, screw up, and make up little challenges for yourself. I consider @Aprz a really good programmer and he basically self-taught himself using books and the internet. I remember watching *him browse through *forums and joining little competitions/goals such as building a randomizer (instead of using the rand() function). I enjoyed making a Morse code converter and also a resizeable and rotating matrix of numbers; I also made a cost analysis program for a delivery problem. There are so many fun little programs you can make.

          *edit (I typed this in a rush before class and there were so many unreasonable and difficult to understand typos)
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            Joshy, Oct 21, 2014 Last edited by Joshy, Oct 21, 2014
          • Dec 30, 2006
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            What she said up there.
            Codeacademy
          • Oct 27, 2010
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            C++ is great, there's no doubt about that.

            If you are looking for fast return and quick marketability though learn an interpreted language.

            I recommend something like Ruby. Quick, easy, instantaneous return on efforts. It's object oriented so you'll set yourself up for Java. Additionally, it's one of the hottest languages right now and you'll get a lot of money with very little (sometimes none) experience.

            If you are looking for really high return on your effort try out C#. You'll make something awesome and probably have no idea how you made it.

            A lot of people are going to recommend something like C++ or C because you'll learn more and have more control over fine grain stuff. This is true and both are very powerful. That fact is though that programming languages are becoming more and more obfuscated every day and the demand for a C developer is far less than it is for a Java, C#, Ruby, or Python developer. Don't get me wrong you should study C at some point so you at least know how a computer works. But the fact of that matter is that you don't need to now-a-days.

            If you want to learn something bleeding edge and a gain a bit more knowledge than the others learn Go.
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            • Jun 11, 2012
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              Extract the whole thing in a folder. There will be a eclipse.exe, start that. Before though, windows is buttretarded and there isn't a clear way to specify the compiler. Download Mingw, add the compiler to the path, start eclipse.exe.
              Follow this first: http://max.berger.name/howto/cdt/ar01s03.html#wincompiler
              Follow this after : http://max.berger.name/howto/cdt/ar01s04.html

              Unfortunately C/C++ aren't up on CodeAcademy apparently, I think Java too. I'm semi-surprised but it make somewhat make sense. Programming languages are odd, forced upon thee it ain't fun, try to come up a way to drive a laser to deviate using a microprocessors and the glass you just drunk tea out of and it's pretty kewl.

              http://www.codecademy.com/forum_questions/527c9724f10c606a0b0022a8
            • Oct 10, 2014
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              I appreciate everyone's replies to my thread and I will be sure to look into everything. This is a lot of information to take in so I will be getting started on it immediately. Wish me luck!
            • Jan 5, 2014
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              My recommendation is to start with Python 2.7 or 3, the language is extremely easy to learn and you can apply your python knowledge to any other programming language with minor modifications (I do think that C/C++/C# are hard to start). You can go to edx https://www.edx.org/course/mitx/mitx-6-00-1x-introduction-computer-2841 and see when MIT will offer another Python course and follow it, the course is great and you learn a great deal about the art of programming. I think that Coursera offers different programming courses, and edx has this all year round https://www.edx.org/course/harvardx/harvardx-cs50x-introduction-computer-1022#.VEf2cmrznIY (but edX>>Coursera).

              My background:
              I am not a programmer but I needed to learn how to write and understand programs so I used the MITx's Python course and I am quite satisfied with the outcome. Also, I've been using C++ since high school and I needed C for university and this summer I had a look at C# and I base my recommendation as a layman who tried different options. Hope this helps!
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              • Oct 11, 2012
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                I third code academy. Great resource to people just starting out.
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