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Why mod games?

Discussion in Gaming started by Kyron The Wise, Jun 28, 2012

  1. Apr 29, 2011
    Posts
    If you know me, you probably know that I like to mod my games. And when I say mod games, I mean REALLY mod my games, using several major gameplay mods all at once alongside some others such as texture, audio, and menu mods. I do this because it expands a game into something new and possibly fun, and I find entertainment in experimenting with what mods will work together.

    However, I've encountered people who see modding in a negative light/don't do it because of complexity. The list of reasons I have heard of why people don't mod includes, but is not limited to:

    1.) It's way too hard!!

    2.) (Insert Game Name Here) is good as it is.

    3.) I don't want to break my game

    4.) Modding is the same as cheating you stupid n00b

    There are some other reasons I have heard, but these are the major ones I have encountered that can be applied to any game.

    1.) It's way too hard!!
    The most common one I have heard is the first one. Gamers can be reluctant to mod their game because they are intimidated by the length of some of the "how to" guides to modding games found on the internet. It doesn't help that some of said guidess can be useless, being out of date because of game/system updates.

    The thing is, after you get used to modding one game, the process is usually similiar when modding another game. You figure out where game files are located, and what kind of mods go in what kind of folders, and so on. And that's if you are modding a game unaided. There are several mod managers out there that simplify the process and let you add mods to a list and activate/deactivate them at will. Prime examples (That I use) include Nexus Mod Manager (Which can manage mods for Elder Scrolls III-V, as well as Fallout 3 and Vegas) and the ever popular Steam Workshop, which makes modding certain games as easy as clicking a single button. Even if you are wanting to mod a game that isn't supported by any mod manager (Which might be true for some obscure games), the steps to adding the mod are usually worth it.

    2.) (Insert Game Name Here) is good as it is.
    I have encountered this answer almost as much as the first. People play a game and are hooked to it. As they are already having fun with it, they see no reason why they should alter it in any way.

    The thing is, they may think this way because they have little or no idea of how far the game can be taken. There are mods such as Monster Mod (TESV), Project Nevada (FO:NV), Requiem for the Capital Wasteland (Also FO:NV but at the same time FO3. See my other thread on it here), and Equivalent Exchange (Minecraft), just to name a few for some of the biggest for popular games.

    Even if you are that entranced by the normal gameplay and don't want to add crazy shit into your game, there are so many other mods that can be installed that may just alter the lighting, animation (CoughGettingridofApelikeanimationsinSkyrimCough), or sounds. Some mods even fix bugs they might not have been caught by a game's dev team (which is all too common in many games these days), or even improve performance of a game without having to get new hardware or cancelling your 10 gig kinky porn download. Hell, there are even mods that modify other mods modception.

    3.)I don't want to break my game/saves/face
    Mods, while a great amount of fun, do have the potential to screw a game up. This can usually be attributed to one of three things, depending on the game.

    First, the author may suck at modding, or be a troll and purposely make a poor mod, which results in a mod that can fill your game with errors, or your computer with viruses. This being the internet, such things are common, so one should already know to take precautions. Only download mods from reputable sites, such as the Nexus or Minecraft Forums, and check the comments left by other downloaders to see if there are any errors encountered by them. Also, as a general rule, if there aren't any pics, be extremely wary of downloading the file. Either let some nub elsewhere on the internet make the download and comment about whether or not it infected his/her computer with a CP virus, or download the file and check it over with a virus scanner (Even with the scanner, I would feel better letting someone else risking their computer first).
    Pics or GTFO is a phrase that can be applied to many things on the internetz.

    The game may have been updated since the time that the mod was last posted or updated. As an example, Minecraft, which gets updates quite often, will break your game if you ever try to use a mod made for a version different than whatever version Minecraft is on (Using a mod made for Minecraft 1.2.5 will most likely game-break a Minecraft 1.1 client, and a mod made for 1.1 will break a 1.2.5 client). Make sure to keep an eye on planned game updates. Also be sure to check a mods webpage when it gets updated, as certain updates can cause your game to fail if you don't take certain steps before installing, whether it be removing your items from a chest, or removing an old copy of a mod version before installing the new one.

    Finally, if you want to install multiple mods, there is a chance that they will conflict with each other and cause a CTD (Crash to Desktop). There are things to be done to prevent this, but they vary depending on the game. If you start to mod your game(s) alot, you will most likely encounter this frequently.

    The answer is the same for all three of these problems: Back your files up. Games like Skyrim and Fallout usually only require you to load an older save file (From before you added the mod) and if you do need to backup, you only need to backup your save files. For games like Minecraft, you need to back up your worlds, your character, and your mods folder (If you don't backup the mods folder, you will lose any mods that actually worked when you reinstall, which can be a pain in the ass if you have 10 mods you need to go redownload).

    4.)Modding is the same as cheating you stupid n00b. Uninstall Win32 if you can't play the normal game.

    Yes, there are some mods that are OP and for the n00bling, doing things such as maxing stats, adding OP items, or adding a prop spawner. However, for every cheat mod, there is so many more legit mods. Some of them make the game harder, adding features such as hypothermia (In TESV, this can be a bitch) or increasing enemy strength beyond the game's hardest difficulty. Some of them add enemies that can utterly destroy an unprepared character, increase the immersion factor of a game, or just make the game look prettier. Is it cheating that I have a portable Dwemer tower in my inventory,a castle in the mountains in Skyrim, and can go aid city guards against a large scale monster attack? Maybe. Are you incredibly fucking jelly that I have a castle in the mountains and a portable Dwemer tower in my game while you are stuck with Breezehome, just sitting there because there is nothing to kill nearby? Yes.

    Depending on the game, modding communities can be quite massive, spawning thousands of mods. Skyrim, on Steam Workshop alone, currently has a little under 8,000 mods archived (And the Workshop has very few mods compared to places like the Nexus). It is possible (I've done it for hours at a time) to lose yourself in the mod lists, especially if you start watching mod reviews on youtube. I was looking up a mod that would increase my Skyrim performance, and 2 hours later, I was looking at a mod that added a Balrog inside of some Dwarven ruins.

    To show what mods can do, I've embedded below five videos. The first three are all Skyrim videos (The Great Battles of Skyrim series, which uses different mods in each one), the fourth is a review of the Aether Mod for Minecraft (Unfortunately, due to Minecrafts tendency to update all of the time, and it breaking mods each time it does, the Aether team is holding off on updating for a while), and the fifth is a trailer for Project Nevada, a massive mod for Fallout New Vegas (And FO3 if you use Requiem for the Capital Wasteland).

    GBOS 1 (Skyrim)



    GBOS 2 (Skyrim)



    GBOS 3 (Skyrim)


    Aether Mod Review (Minecraft)


    Project Nevada (Fallout- New Vegas)
    • Like Like x 1
    • Jun 3, 2012
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      The funny thing is: games usually accommodating for modding, such as Fallout or Elder Scrolls games, are much harder to mod than, say, STALKER or Dungeon Siege

      Fucking Bethesda
    • Dec 6, 2011
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      WhErE thE hEll is GTA IV mods? D= It's onE of thE most vastly moddEd gamE out thErE. SomEbody EvEn has a "zombiEland" mod for it.
    • Mar 12, 2008
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      I tried getting aether mod to work, it ended up fucking my game files.

      I think i did something wrong, cause the screen stayed black forever, but i followed instructions as close as i could. Fuck the modder's broken english.
      • Agree Agree x 1
      • Apr 29, 2011
        Posts
        Black screen can mean that you forgot to delete the META-INF file. Said file is effectively the watermark for the game saying that the game is unmodded. Minecraft will blackscreen if mods are installed and Meta-Inf is not deleted.

        Also, broken English? Where were you downloading the mod from, a website linked on a porn page? The Aether mod has instructional videos on its page, in perfectly understandable English. For minecraft, if its not minecraftforum.net, it's probably not a good idea.

        Also, Brett, I mentioned mods for games that I currently have on PC. Unfortunately, GTA IV is not on my PC. And is capitalizing all of your E's and making them a bright color really necessary?

        @tupac You can mod the Elder Scrolls (3-5) or Fallout (3-Vegas) games by pressing a button on the Nexus Mod Manager. I am really confused as to how it can get harder than that.
        Kyron The Wise, Jun 28, 2012 Last edited by Kyron The Wise, Jun 28, 2012
      • May 15, 2011
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        Not all modders speak english, and I to have tried modding various games, but the modder didn't speak fluent english, so it can be hard at times to fully understand what the instructions are. Usually just give up if I can't understand after one read through.
      • Mar 12, 2008
        Posts
        I deleted it, and as said, followed instructions as well as the videos and .TXT file said.

        A lot of people who make videos automatically assume people know to remove/move/change certain files, and if the guy talking is 13, they don't do Step-by-Step instructions.

        The .TXT file isn't Step-by-Step either, as it claims to be. There are lots of broken transitions and missing words that are crucial to installing mods that I've seen are left out, and as such, i have to guess what the guy is trying to say.

        I downloaded all my files off of minecraftforum.net.

        I've since scrapped the idea of mods, cause I like playing close to vanilla as possible. Vanilla itself had more depth and variety added to it over the years, so there's always something to do.


        also what dirtbag said.
      • Apr 29, 2011
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        Many minecraft mods also require other mods to run, such as Risugami's Modloader (Actually, all mods need that one), and some others. Many also have evolved to the point where you can drop a RAR inside a mod folder and thats the end of it.

        However, your opinion on modding is your own, so I won't try to force anything. The point of this thread is to persuade people to give modding a chance, which you have.
      • Mar 16, 2008
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        Zombie Mod is a mod. Just saying.
      • Apr 29, 2011
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        When I say mod, I mean having to download, install, and what not.

        CS doesn't count as modding because it is effectively itself a mod that has ascended into a game of its own. Plus, with Zombie MOD (Yes, I realized it was a mod, though it may have taken me a while to realize that the "mod" at the end meant it was mod. Never would've have figured it out if not for the underline) the player doesn't have to go and download anything off the internet or go into program files (Unless you are on a god-forsaken macbook), which is the kind of modding I am trying to persuade players to try.
      • May 14, 2011
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        In zm you dont mod anything. The mod is given to you server side. Its like the Arma 2 mod mentioned in that other thread. You don't do any modding. So Josh it doesn't count.

        I dislike modding. It ruins the game imo. The only game I have ever moddedni is just cause 2 where I have unlimited hp, 2km graple. This just ruined the game for me as its way too easy now. The only reason in would mod is for textute packs

        Sent from my phone.
      • Sep 26, 2010
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        For those of you wanting to mod skyrim without having to put forth much effort (also for people not wanting to royally fuck their game up), use the http://skyrim.nexusmods.com/mods/modmanager/ . You simply download the program, download mods from the site, open the program, and literally switch mods on and off. The most mods I had running at once was around 40+ but I've known others who have had more running simultaneously.
        MuffinFuhrer, Jul 2, 2012 Last edited by MuffinFuhrer, Jul 2, 2012
      • Apr 29, 2011
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        As I said in section 4, yes, there are mods that utterly break a game, and make it so even the most incompetent gamer could play on the hardest difficulty and not break a sweat.

        HOWEVER, as I said, it really depends on the mods you are using. The one you used is a bad example of a mod, one that makes things fun at first, but gets really boring. I try to stay away from game-breaking mods such as that, and stick to the ones that provide a challenge, especially if the mod in question adds new content. Example: Monster Mod+offshoots for Skyrim. Monster mod adds in several (As in, around 100) new creatures to the game, some of which are retextures, some of which are new. The mod also has several offshoot mods, such as one that lets you buy spells to conjure said monsters (Gold and Magicka costs for said spells vary depending on the strength of the creature in question), one that adds unique drops to the new creatures, and, my personal favorite, Monster Wars. Monster Wars makes it so occasionally, packs of monsters will attack cities, getting into fights with the new Blue Stripe faction that guards each city. The monster packs vary with each city, meaning you get things like Ice Giants at Windhelm, and things like Ebony Treants (The Ents are Marching!) and Spriggans attacking towns in more forested areas. I could go on about all the different bosses and dungeons the mod adds (CoughMinesOfMoriaAndBalrogCough) but I think I got my point across.

        Tl;dr Ghost used a cheat mod that made a game too easy for him, I already talked about the subject in my Vadleon-esque OP, he should look at more balanced mods before making a verdict like that.

        Oh, and Muffin, thanks for your post. I mentioned the Nexus Mod Manager a bit, but put no link to it. In fact, I didn't put any links at all. Woops.

        Oh, and my current Skyrim active mod count is 63 mods. I think thats a bit on the skimpy side. Must go find moar mods.
      • Nov 29, 2010
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        I've played skyrim with over 100 mods installed. It really depends on the mods you pick, since some can be gamebreaking and some can ruin the game alltogether in terms of experience, however I loved every minute playing skyrim with mods, playing around with ENB settings to get the game to look even better and there's a lot of things you can install into skyrim that makes the game feel that much more epic.
      • Sep 26, 2010
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        I'm here to provide.

        Oh and for those of you who use a SSD and HDD simultaneously, there's a program that allows you to move all of your steam files onto your HDD while still having your SSD be the primary boot device. It's called "Steam Mover," however I haven't had luck in both moving files and modding them with the Nexus program for Fallout 3 GOTY...not implying that other games haven't been as successful since Morrowind didn't mind the graphics mod I applied (granted that was one mod and the additional 10 resulted in the game crashing). So ya lol you might have trouble using the program if your files are on another drive.
      • May 14, 2011
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        Why use a program? Simply drag steam.exe and your steam apps folder across to the other drive and run steam.exe, no need to use a 3rd party program.

        Sent from my phone.
        • Agree Agree x 1